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Metal Implants and Dental Amalgam: The FDA Announces Public Meeting and Paper

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a paper on metal-containing implants and a panel meeting as part of ongoing efforts to evaluate materials in medical devices to address potential safety questions.

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Cervical Muscle Tenderness in Temporomandibular Disorders and Its Associations with Diagnosis, Disease-Related Outcomes, and Comorbid Pain Conditions

To analyze cervical tenderness scores (CTS) in patients with various temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and in controls and to examine associations of CTS with demographic and clinical parameters.

You, Your Esophagus and TMD

The esophagus is a roughly ten-inch hollow tube that descends from your throat through the diaphragm into the stomach. Normally, it is a one-way street transporting food you swallow to the stomach for digestion. But in GERD— Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease— the flow can reverse so that stomach contents (including gastric acids) are regurgitated upwards to cause a burning sensation (heartburn), nausea, pain and other distressing symptoms.

It's Time to Be Part of the Solution

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) is well underway. We strongly encourage everyone affected by TMD to write to the NAM committee letting them know what it is like to live with TMD and your experiences with getting care.

Marion: Conservative and Reversible Treatments Are Key

  • May 13, 2015

Facial pain and jaw pain were once a big part of my life. For a time, I thought it would be the end of me. Eventually, I recovered with patience, physical therapy and time.

This phrase saved my life: Treatments should be conservative, reversible and noninvasive. Following that advice allowed me to avoid harmful treatments. And eventually, I got better. That was more than 10 years ago and though I am normal again, I will always remember those difficult days.

I developed facial pain in 1997 when a dentist left a filling too high. He gave me a hard plastic splint to “re-position” my jaw. Bad idea! Most facial pain is muscular and will get better on its own with time and simple treatments. Unfortunately providers may treat with aggressive measures that cause more harm. That’s what happened to me.

The splint caused a permanent injury and left me in terrible pain. About this time I found The TMJ Association, which saved my life. The TMJ Association provided science-based, reliable information about facial pain and TMJ disorders. I also read a brochure from the National Institutes of Health with the life-changing phrase. “Treatments should be conservative, reversible and noninvasive.” The pain was very bad and I just wanted to feel better. Many of us reach that point and agree to harmful, costly treatments. When we don’t get better, we are often abandoned by our dental providers.

After discovering the TMJ Association and information from the National Institutes of Health, I felt hope. I saw a compassionate family doctor who prescribed physical therapy with a specially trained therapist. I got better and eventually, the pain was gone. These days, I have respectful dentist who understands my need to avoid wide opening and whose approaches are conservative.

Because of my gratitude to the TMJ Association, I became a patient volunteer several years ago. The TMJ Association patient support network offers a way for me to reach out and help others.

I have three dogs and three cats. I work as a freelance writer and enjoy running, swimming, hiking, yoga and music. I am a fan of House MD.

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