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Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

Opportunity to Voice Your Opinion: U.S. Government Officials Want To Hear from Patients with Pain

FDA Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain On July 9, 2018, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain. https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/05/15/2018-10284/patient-focused-

Consider Including the TMJA in Your Financial Planning

We were recently contacted by Tom P. who informed us that he was including The TMJ Association (TMJA), in his financial planning. Tom wrote the following for us to share with our readers:

Teshania's Story

  • Dec 15, 2015

My name is Teshania, and I would like to share my TMJ story. Back in May 2012, I felt like I had an ear infection but also severe pain in my jaw. The pain was so bad that I could not close my mouth completely. I would hear a lot of popping in my ear as well and could not understand what was going on. I tried to associate the symptoms with allergies by taking different types of allergy medications, but they did not work. To make a long story short, I ended up seeing six doctors, an ENT specialist, a dentist and an orthodontist. They prescribed Naproxen, Robaxin, Tramadol, and a muscle relaxer. I was even fitted for a night guard. Two doctors told me I would just have to live with it. As a military spouse rather than a veteran, I was denied physical therapy.

Since then, the jaw pain and most of the popping in my ear has gone away. I still live with a feeling of tightness in my jaw joint. It does get bad at night, but I just deal with it. I exercise, do jaw exercises, stretch daily, and avoid hard foods. Also, I'm working on a soft food/no sugar meal plan. A bad habit of cheek chewing and phone cradling may explain why the discomfort hasn't completely gone away. To help, I just purchased a gel beaded TMJ relief head wrap. 

Praying for a cure, I hope I don't have to live the rest of my life with this discomfort.  I wish the same for others who are dealing with this disorder. Thanks for listening. 

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Comments:

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cmmessin56 - Saturday, October 31, 2015
I just wanted to let you know I am a US Air Force Veteran. My TMJ problems began in the Military in 1984. Multiple surgeries both jaws and medically discharged in 1992. I am greatful that my condition is treted very well from the VA Dental Clinic. My first thing I did after discharge was to apply for benefits. I just wanted to make sure my TMJ eould be tsjen care, as I new it would be very costly. I do not know how You and Other TMJ sufferers handle the pain physically amd mentally. Without my TMJ Oral Surgery Department Staff, I literally do not know what and where i would be now. Take care!