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Metal Implants and Dental Amalgam: The FDA Announces Public Meeting and Paper

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a paper on metal-containing implants and a panel meeting as part of ongoing efforts to evaluate materials in medical devices to address potential safety questions.

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Cervical Muscle Tenderness in Temporomandibular Disorders and Its Associations with Diagnosis, Disease-Related Outcomes, and Comorbid Pain Conditions

To analyze cervical tenderness scores (CTS) in patients with various temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and in controls and to examine associations of CTS with demographic and clinical parameters.

You, Your Esophagus and TMD

The esophagus is a roughly ten-inch hollow tube that descends from your throat through the diaphragm into the stomach. Normally, it is a one-way street transporting food you swallow to the stomach for digestion. But in GERD— Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease— the flow can reverse so that stomach contents (including gastric acids) are regurgitated upwards to cause a burning sensation (heartburn), nausea, pain and other distressing symptoms.

It's Time to Be Part of the Solution

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) is well underway. We strongly encourage everyone affected by TMD to write to the NAM committee letting them know what it is like to live with TMD and your experiences with getting care.

Daniel's Self Help Tips

  • Nov 2, 2016

Hello,  my name is Daniel.  I have had a TMJ issue for the past three years.  I have been diagnosed and treated by over seven different doctors ranging from family doctors, multiple dentists to oral facial pain specialists and surgeons. I have had CAT Scans and an MRI.  My TMJ diagnosis has been confirmed with no results for a cure.  I have not had any surgeries.  I have read many books and articles regarding TMJ.  Now the good news. I still have TMJ with the limited opening but have taken my pain levels from 90% all the time to almost 1% very occassionally.  I have done most of this on my own by doing a few simple things.  Facial and head pain with TMJ can be unbearable at times.  I hope the following advice can help you.

  •  Don’t force the jaw opening

I have managed the pain by not trying to force the opening further than what I can do.  Forcing the opening past it's current limit is where all the pain starts.  I also noticed that if I yawn or hear my jaw pop from opening too far within an hour that is when there is the most facial and head pain from the popping of the bones together. 

If I do not force the opening and yawn easily without popping the jaw, I have limited my pain the past two years to where I do not need any pain medication or any type of pain reliever.  I even wore a nightly mouthguard for the first two years and have not needed it for almost a year now. 

  • No clenching

Also, no clenching during the day and don't lean your chin on your hand.  Keep your mouth open and relaxed.  At nighttime here a few things to limit clenching during sleep.  Exercise in the morning or afternoon.  Not right before bed.  Do not consume any caffeine or sugar or alcohol or tobacco 3-4 hours prior to going to sleep.  Try a type of tea that can help relax you to get better rest.  The more relaxed you are at bedtime the less likely you will clench during sleep which can cause most of the pain in the morning.

  •  Good body posture

Also keep good posture as this will tie in with keeping your whole body relaxed along with the jaw. 

  •  Avoid hard and chewy foods

Don't bite into hard things like apples. Limit chewing gum and taffy type of candy that causes constant or hard chewing. As for the limited opening, still eat everything you like.  Just cut it up into smaller pieces.  Even a large sandwich can be eaten by using a fork with the meat and then take a bite of bread.  Not a big deal and you do adapt. 

I still live a normal life with a great family and good job.  Wishing everyone less pain and a better life.  I hope this helps you as it has me. 

Best wishes, 

Daniel

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