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New Report on Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care

Over a year and half ago, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) began the most comprehensive study ever undertaken on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). The study assessed the current state of TMD research, education and training, the safety and efficacy of clinical treatments, and associated burden and costs.

Statement by NIDCR Acting Director on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report on Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

I am pleased to announce the release of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. As underscored by the comprehensive report, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are a diverse and still poorly understood set of complex, painful conditions affecting the jaw muscles and tissues, temporomandibular joints, and associated nerves. Clearly, there is much more to be understood, and these conditions continue to confound medical and dental health care providers and researchers.

Have you seen the film Dark Waters?

The Film. Dark Waters is about attorney Robert Billott's real-life 20 year legal battle against DuPont chemical for releasing toxic waste - perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA - into Parkersburg, West Virginia's water supply, with devastating health effects on the townspeople and livestock. PFOA, also known as C8, is a man-made chemical. It is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals known as fluorotelomers.

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Amy

  • May 4, 2016

While it is difficult to pinpoint, I can generally say that my journey with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) started after my pregnancy when I was 20. I was already dealing with chronic back pain and a few other "injuries" that seemed to never heal. I really began noticing jaw pain after I had my daughter. My good days consisted of eating a lot of pasta with well-cooked vegetables and no meat because the meat was too hard to chew. On bad days, I couldn't eat anything solid without pain and had a headache that debilitated me for the rest of the day. I would go days eating only broth, plain yogurt, and mashed potatoes. I have always been amazed at how tiring it is to be in pain constantly. Even if I wasn't hurting too much, I still had no energy. I remember feeling so bad that I often couldn't play with my toddler. The first five to six years of her life were like this. As a result my daughter, now eight years old, is quite independent.

About four years ago, I was involved in a minor motorcycle accident [while riding as a passenger,] and my right hip was displaced and required physical therapy. I completed the physical therapy but was still in a lot of pain. After my doctor saw the pain that I was still feeling, he told me that my hip looked good, my mobility was back, and I shouldn't be in very much pain anymore. That is what prompted him to start looking into fibromyalgia. I was soon diagnosed and prescribed Gabapentin (Neurontin). The medication gave my life back to me. I have been taking it for the last three years or so. This medication not only helped with the widespread body pain, but also with the TMD pain, though I still have some functional issues with my jaw locking.

My advice to anyone dealing with jaw pain, or any chronic pain, is to try to look at the positive side of life; keep trying to find a doctor who won't look down or dismiss you. After seeing a number of doctors, I found a wonderful primary care physician. Keep trying non-invasive things that you think may help. I wish I could say they will work, but they're worth trying. In the long run, they may lead you to finding things that help!  Amy

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Last month Amy responded to our Facebook page post in which we asked for a TMD patient who would be willing to be interviewed for a magazine article on Fibromyalgia. Thank you, Amy, for volunteering! The NIH MedlinePlus magazine has a very large audience and will generate a greater awareness about TMD. You can read Amy's interview in the Spring 2016 issue of NIH MedlinePlus which is available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/spring16/articles/spring16pg22-23.html