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Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Why Head and Face Pain Cause More Suffering

Hate headaches? The distress you feel is not all in your -- well, head. People consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body.

Migraine and Coronary Artery Disease: A Genetic Connection

There has long been as association between migraine headaches and vascular (blood vessel) dysfunction of some kind, underscored by epidemiological studies and other research. New evidence for a genetic connection now comes from the analysis of several large data sets of each condition based on Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

Patients with Chronic Migraine More Likely to Suffer from TMD

In a recent study, researchers found that patients with chronic migraines which usually occur for more than 15 days a month are likely to experience three times more severe symptoms of Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) than patients with an episodic migraine.

Are you a TMD patient with Tinnitus?

It's a ringing sound, a buzzing, a hiss.... It can be soft or loud, intermittent or present all the time, affecting one ear or both. In whatever way it affects you, it's damned annoying, unpleasant, distracting. Indeed, it is considered the worst problem affecting human beings after pain and dizziness.

Amy

  • May 4, 2016

While it is difficult to pinpoint, I can generally say that my journey with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) started after my pregnancy when I was 20. I was already dealing with chronic back pain and a few other "injuries" that seemed to never heal. I really began noticing jaw pain after I had my daughter. My good days consisted of eating a lot of pasta with well-cooked vegetables and no meat because the meat was too hard to chew. On bad days, I couldn't eat anything solid without pain and had a headache that debilitated me for the rest of the day. I would go days eating only broth, plain yogurt, and mashed potatoes. I have always been amazed at how tiring it is to be in pain constantly. Even if I wasn't hurting too much, I still had no energy. I remember feeling so bad that I often couldn't play with my toddler. The first five to six years of her life were like this. As a result my daughter, now eight years old, is quite independent.

About four years ago, I was involved in a minor motorcycle accident [while riding as a passenger,] and my right hip was displaced and required physical therapy. I completed the physical therapy but was still in a lot of pain. After my doctor saw the pain that I was still feeling, he told me that my hip looked good, my mobility was back, and I shouldn't be in very much pain anymore. That is what prompted him to start looking into fibromyalgia. I was soon diagnosed and prescribed Gabapentin (Neurontin). The medication gave my life back to me. I have been taking it for the last three years or so. This medication not only helped with the widespread body pain, but also with the TMD pain, though I still have some functional issues with my jaw locking.

My advice to anyone dealing with jaw pain, or any chronic pain, is to try to look at the positive side of life; keep trying to find a doctor who won't look down or dismiss you. After seeing a number of doctors, I found a wonderful primary care physician. Keep trying non-invasive things that you think may help. I wish I could say they will work, but they're worth trying. In the long run, they may lead you to finding things that help!  Amy

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Last month Amy responded to our Facebook page post in which we asked for a TMD patient who would be willing to be interviewed for a magazine article on Fibromyalgia. Thank you, Amy, for volunteering! The NIH MedlinePlus magazine has a very large audience and will generate a greater awareness about TMD. You can read Amy's interview in the Spring 2016 issue of NIH MedlinePlus which is available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/spring16/articles/spring16pg22-23.html