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New Report on Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care

Over a year and half ago, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) began the most comprehensive study ever undertaken on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). The study assessed the current state of TMD research, education and training, the safety and efficacy of clinical treatments, and associated burden and costs.

Statement by NIDCR Acting Director on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report on Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

I am pleased to announce the release of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. As underscored by the comprehensive report, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are a diverse and still poorly understood set of complex, painful conditions affecting the jaw muscles and tissues, temporomandibular joints, and associated nerves. Clearly, there is much more to be understood, and these conditions continue to confound medical and dental health care providers and researchers.

Have you seen the film Dark Waters?

The Film. Dark Waters is about attorney Robert Billott's real-life 20 year legal battle against DuPont chemical for releasing toxic waste - perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA - into Parkersburg, West Virginia's water supply, with devastating health effects on the townspeople and livestock. PFOA, also known as C8, is a man-made chemical. It is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals known as fluorotelomers.

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Carolyn

  • Sep 21, 2016

Hello, my name is Carolyn and I am 59 years old. I found out that I had TMJ when I was 23 years old. I could no longer close my mouth to bite and chew food. I was in a car accident when I was 18 and was told I probably had whiplash. I also had an over and open bite which only made things worse. 

I have worked for 30 plus years and finally had to "retire" due to my health. I cannot describe the pain, but the closest I can come is what I would imagine is bone on bone pain. An example I use is to imagine a tennis player having his/her shoulder dislocated and still having to play the game of tennis. With TMD I still have to talk, smile, laugh, kiss, and eat; most often this is done with pain. Another issue is that I cannot take pain medication without taking a nausea pill. If I take both a nausea and a pain pill it completely knocks me out, so I have to choose between living in pain or going to sleep without pain. When I was 23 years old I didn't have pain, but in the last 10 years the pain has been horrible. I was taking 8 to 12 Advil a day because it seemed to help the pain; however I was told to stop because of its effect on my kidney function. At this point I have to decide whether to take Advil to help the pain or lose my kidneys.

I have a great dentist. He has made me several splints, because I have worn several out. He has tried equilibration, but as I get older he says I probably have arthritis and some nerve damage. I am sure I have both. I have seen a TMJ specialist who told me to save my money because he would be doing the same treatments my dentist had already done. I feel hopeless and helpless and a complete failure as a wife, mother, and grandmother, because I never "want" to do anything. I have a wonderful, supportive family, but my husband is the only one who really knows and sees how bad the pain is, and he feels so helpless because he can't fix it for me that I try not to let him see me at this point. I can usually hang in there until noon, but after that it all does downhill, and by five or six I am ready to knock myself out.

I wish I could find a pain management doctor who could help. Again, I can't take pain pills. I would like to try a muscle relaxer to relax my jaw muscles which are spasming by the end of the day, but no one wants to give me a prescription for fear I would become addicted to the medication. At this point I just don't care; I just need someone to listen, to help, and work with me, instead of just telling me medicine can't help. I try not to complain in public. I'm sure there are people with cancer who are in a lot of pain, but when you are in a lot of pain and cannot get relief, it is the most miserable situation anyone can be in. This is my story. If anyone has any suggestions, I'm open to hearing them.