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The TMJ Association is pleased to partner with Inspire to bring you the TMJ Cafe, a free online support network and discussion community for those with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). We invite you to meet others like you, share experiences and tips for getting through the day, and give and receive support.

Sustained and Repeated Mouth Opening Leads to Development of Painful Temporomandibular Disorders Involving Macrophage/Microglia Activation in Mice

Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a set of heterogeneous musculoskeletal conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and/or the masticatory muscles. Up to 33% of the population has had at least one symptom of TMD with 5-10% of them requiring treatment. Common symptoms include limited jaw movement, joint sound, and pain in the orofacial area. Once TMD becomes chronic, it can be debilitating with comorbidities that greatly reduce one's overall quality of life. However, the underlying mechanism of TMD is unclear due to the multicausative nature of the disease.

Prevalence of TMD in Sjӧgren Syndrome Patients

Sjӧgren's Syndrome seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders.

Early Molecular Response and Microanatomical Changes in the Masseter Muscle and Mandibular Head After Botulinum Toxin Intervention in Adult Mice

The Botox-injected masseters had greatly increased expression of genes involved in muscle atrophy at the 1 week time point compared to the control side muscles. At the end of the study, 2 weeks after injection, the Botox-injected masseters were about 20% smaller than the control side masseters, and the Botox-side condyles had lost about 40% of relative bone area compared to the control side condyles.

Centralized Pain in TMD: Is It All in the Head?

We are pleased to introduce Sophia Stone, a new contributor to The TMJ Association, whose passion is to separate TMD fact from TMD fiction. Sophia has a background in medicine and research and can draw on her personal experience as a TMD patient.

TMJA's 8th Scientific Meeting

  • Mar 1, 2017

TMJA celebrated its 8th biennial scientific meeting this fall provocatively challenging
scientists to answer, "How Can Precision Medicine Be Applied to Temporomandibular
Disorders and its Comorbidities?" For three days scientists from fields outside TMD,
as well as some of the leaders you have read about in these News Bites, addressed
this question from multiple points of view. To set the stage, National Institutes of Health
(NIH) spokespersons explained exactly what precision medicine was all about. It is the
attempt to customize healthcare, with medical decisions, practices, and/or
products being tailored to the individual patient
.

To achieve that goal, a major new program, the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative,
under NIH leadership, has been launched to amass health data on a huge sample of
volunteers. No less than one million Americans--male, female, old, young, sorted by
race, ethnicity, geographic locale and socioeconomic status--will be recruited to work
with scientists to provide genetic information, electronic health records, and a range of
physiological, lifestyle and environmental data. This will take time, obviously, but the
experts say it is an effort that is doable now because of the rapid advances in
technology that make genome sequencing cheap and fast, the adoption of electronic
health records, and new techniques for gathering personal data on an individual using
sensors and devices that could be built into a smart phone app.

That said, attendees at the TMJA meeting heard speakers describe research on many
fronts. Among them: ways in which TMD patients with overlapping pain conditions may
be sorted into subsets with common characteristics that permit more selective targets
for treatment, new ways of delivering and testing drugs, further fine-tuning of chronic
pain pathways, more on interactions between the nervous and immune systems, and
new ways of modelling disease using stem cells. A summary of the meeting and
recommendations for future research will appear in  an upcoming issue of TMJ Science.

TMJ Disorders

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