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New Report on Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care

Over a year and half ago, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) began the most comprehensive study ever undertaken on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). The study assessed the current state of TMD research, education and training, the safety and efficacy of clinical treatments, and associated burden and costs.

Statement by NIDCR Acting Director on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report on Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

I am pleased to announce the release of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. As underscored by the comprehensive report, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are a diverse and still poorly understood set of complex, painful conditions affecting the jaw muscles and tissues, temporomandibular joints, and associated nerves. Clearly, there is much more to be understood, and these conditions continue to confound medical and dental health care providers and researchers.

Have you seen the film Dark Waters?

The Film. Dark Waters is about attorney Robert Billott's real-life 20 year legal battle against DuPont chemical for releasing toxic waste - perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA - into Parkersburg, West Virginia's water supply, with devastating health effects on the townspeople and livestock. PFOA, also known as C8, is a man-made chemical. It is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals known as fluorotelomers.

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

TMJA's 8th Scientific Meeting

  • Mar 1, 2017

TMJA celebrated its 8th biennial scientific meeting this fall provocatively challenging
scientists to answer, "How Can Precision Medicine Be Applied to Temporomandibular
Disorders and its Comorbidities?" For three days scientists from fields outside TMD,
as well as some of the leaders you have read about in these News Bites, addressed
this question from multiple points of view. To set the stage, National Institutes of Health
(NIH) spokespersons explained exactly what precision medicine was all about. It is the
attempt to customize healthcare, with medical decisions, practices, and/or
products being tailored to the individual patient
.

To achieve that goal, a major new program, the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative,
under NIH leadership, has been launched to amass health data on a huge sample of
volunteers. No less than one million Americans--male, female, old, young, sorted by
race, ethnicity, geographic locale and socioeconomic status--will be recruited to work
with scientists to provide genetic information, electronic health records, and a range of
physiological, lifestyle and environmental data. This will take time, obviously, but the
experts say it is an effort that is doable now because of the rapid advances in
technology that make genome sequencing cheap and fast, the adoption of electronic
health records, and new techniques for gathering personal data on an individual using
sensors and devices that could be built into a smart phone app.

That said, attendees at the TMJA meeting heard speakers describe research on many
fronts. Among them: ways in which TMD patients with overlapping pain conditions may
be sorted into subsets with common characteristics that permit more selective targets
for treatment, new ways of delivering and testing drugs, further fine-tuning of chronic
pain pathways, more on interactions between the nervous and immune systems, and
new ways of modelling disease using stem cells. A summary of the meeting and
recommendations for future research will appear in  an upcoming issue of TMJ Science.

TMJ Disorders

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