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Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

Opportunity to Voice Your Opinion: U.S. Government Officials Want To Hear from Patients with Pain

FDA Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain On July 9, 2018, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain. https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/05/15/2018-10284/patient-focused-

Consider Including the TMJA in Your Financial Planning

We were recently contacted by Tom P. who informed us that he was including The TMJ Association (TMJA), in his financial planning. Tom wrote the following for us to share with our readers:

#*!"@!**! ... May Help Your Pain... and Improve Strength!

  • May 31, 2017

Our headline is adopting the comic strip convention of using symbols to denote swear words because we are intrigued by a report that swearing may have some health benefits. Certainly in our personal lives, we all have felt the satisfaction of exclaiming some forbidden expletive when hitting our thumb with a hammer or as a way of relieving the deep frustration we experience after standing in line and when you reach the box office discovering that the show you wanted to see is sold out. But as a way to reduce pain? and increase strength? Well maybe...

Psychology investigators at Britain's Keele University have conducted a series of investigations in which they found that swearing made individuals more tolerant of pain. They went on to test whether swearing also increased individuals' ability to perform intense exercise and also deepened the strength of their handgrips. 

They tested 29 people in an intense anaerobic exercise regimen and found that their power increased after they had used swear words at the outset compared with the same exercise conducted without swearing. Similarly, in a test of handgrip strength of 52 participants, they found that their grips were stronger following a bout of swearing compared with not swearing.

The investigators initially surmised that swearing stimulates the body's sympathetic nervous system-the fight-or-flight mechanism that increases heart rate and affects energy metabolism, among other things. But when they looked for typical sympathetic system changes they found nothing significant. So now it's back to the drawing board to search for answers. But their findings still hold.

Overlapping Conditions

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