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National Academy of Medicine to Conduct a Study on Temporomandibular Disorders

We want you to be among the first to know that because of the advocacy efforts of The TMJ Association, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) will conduct a first-ever study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Dentists in Distress

Fear of the dentist is practically a rite of passage in youth. Growing up, I wasn't exactly afraid of the dentist; rather, any excuse to leave school early was a powerful incentive. These days, I have a more complicated relationship with dentistry: I go to get answers and try to feel better, but I always pop a prophylactic ibuprofen or two in case my jaw protests from the oral gymnastics.

Patients in Los Angeles or New York City Needed for Clinical Study - Comparative Study of Women Considering or Currently Receiving Botox© Injections for TMJ Pain

Are you a woman with "TMJ" pain in facial muscles, who has either: a. recently had Botox© injections for your pain or b. not had Botox© for your pain but has thought about such treatment? If either is true for you, you may qualify for an observational research study centrally administered by the NYU College of Dentistry. It is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this study is to understand potential health risks that may be caused by treating "TMJ pain" with Botox© injections.

Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

Brenda's Story of Endless Referrals

  • May 13, 2015

In August of 2012, I started having pain and discomfort in my face and jaw. It got very bad quickly, and I couldn't open my mouth or talk. I went to my doctor who said I have a TMJ problem, "go see your dentist." I went to my dentist and he sent me to an orthodontist, who fitted me with a splint that provided some relief. When things didn't get much better I went to a physical therapist and that helped some. Then I stopped getting better, so he referred me to a pain management doctor, who referred me to an oral surgeon and a periodontist. The oral surgeon did a jaw joint wash out, which has not helped as of this writing.

So I went to my doctor, my dentist, an orthodontist, a physical therapist, a pain management doctor, an oral surgeon, counseling and a periodontist with no relief! X-rays and cat scans show nothing wrong. I have been told it is due to stress. I cannot eat anything that requires any chewing; it hurts to talk, laugh, smile, yawn, even kiss! I cannot live like this.

I have digested the fact that I will most likely live with this disorder the rest of my life. I just need to get this pain to a manageable level. I will be getting a new appliance in three weeks to help stop grinding and clenching, which aggravates the situation greatly. I hope to get some relief soon.

©2015 The TMJ Association, Ltd. All rights


In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health