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Some Thoughts on Depression

It is hardly surprising that the chronic pain and limitations in function that many long-time TMJ patients experience can be accompanied by a state of depression, a sense of exhaustion and hopelessness.

Upcoming NAM Public Webinars on TMD

The National Academy of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment is hosting two public web conferences on Wednesday, June 19 and Wednesday, July 31.   Webinar 1: Pati

The NAM Committee Heard from Patients, Too

At the March 28, 2019 public meeting NAM committee members had a chance to hear from TMD patients who had submitted testimony for the record.

Swallowing Changes Related to Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

To investigate whether chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients showed any changes in swallowing compared to a control group. Moreover, it was examined whether swallowing variables and a valid clinic measure of orofacial myofunctional status were associated.

National Academy of Medicine Holds Second TMD Meeting

We have reported previously about the decision of the prestigious National Academy of Medicine (NAM) to convene a committee of experts to examine all aspects of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

Brenda's Story of Endless Referrals

  • May 13, 2015

In August of 2012, I started having pain and discomfort in my face and jaw. It got very bad quickly, and I couldn't open my mouth or talk. I went to my doctor who said I have a TMJ problem, "go see your dentist." I went to my dentist and he sent me to an orthodontist, who fitted me with a splint that provided some relief. When things didn't get much better I went to a physical therapist and that helped some. Then I stopped getting better, so he referred me to a pain management doctor, who referred me to an oral surgeon and a periodontist. The oral surgeon did a jaw joint wash out, which has not helped as of this writing.

So I went to my doctor, my dentist, an orthodontist, a physical therapist, a pain management doctor, an oral surgeon, counseling and a periodontist with no relief! X-rays and cat scans show nothing wrong. I have been told it is due to stress. I cannot eat anything that requires any chewing; it hurts to talk, laugh, smile, yawn, even kiss! I cannot live like this.

I have digested the fact that I will most likely live with this disorder the rest of my life. I just need to get this pain to a manageable level. I will be getting a new appliance in three weeks to help stop grinding and clenching, which aggravates the situation greatly. I hope to get some relief soon.

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