Read the Latest News

Centralized Pain in TMD: Is It All in the Head?

We are pleased to introduce Sophia Stone, a new contributor to The TMJ Association, whose passion is to separate TMD fact from TMD fiction. Sophia has a background in medicine and research and can draw on her personal experience as a TMD patient.

TMD and Burning Mouth Syndrome

A study in the International Journal of Dental Research reporting the latest update on Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) noted two thirds of BMS patients also had Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD).

Stem Cell Study of Jaw Development Could Offer Insight Into Craniofacial Flaws

Scientists in the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Gage Crump have revealed how key genes guide the development of the jaw in zebrafish. These findings may offer clues for understanding craniofacial anomalies in human patients, who sometimes carry a mutation in equivalent genes.

Pain in Your Head Hurts More Than Elsewhere in the Body

Terrie Cowley, Co-Founder and President of The TMJ Association, often remarks that patients tell her that the pain they feel in their jaws is worse than pain elsewhere in the body.

2018 NIDCR and Hill Visits

On February 26, TMJA staff participated in the Friends of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Patient Advocacy Council (PAC), an umbrella group comprising non-profit organizations that work together to advance dental, oral,

Washington Post Article on TMD

  • Oct 3, 2017

The Washington Post recently featured an article on Temporomandibular Disorders. Below is an excerpt from that article and a link to the full story. 

"...It's one of the most common pain disorders, after low back pain and headache," says John Kusiak, acting deputy director of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. "Fortunately, most first-onset cases of TMD will resolve with either no treatment or minimal care."

About 10 percent of people with TMD go on to develop long-term symptoms that affect the quality of their daily lives, Kusiak says. Experts usually define chronic TMD as consistent pain in the jaw area that lasts beyond three months, he says.

"The jaw is very important for a number of things, including how we eat, for smiling, for talking, for singing and for kissing," Kusiak says. "People may have difficulty talking, and smiling, difficulty interacting with others. As a result, they may develop emotional and psychological problems that can lead to the inability to work or communicate."

Scientists don't know what causes it, although trauma to the jaw or temporomandibular joint is a clear risk factor. Most of the time, TMD develops for no obvious reason.

Because the condition is more common in women, scientists are exploring its possible connection to female hormones. They also are studying possible genetic links.

Research suggests that TMD risk factors also might include teeth grinding, which can aggravate the joint, smoking and sleep dysfunction - insomnia or sleep apnea, "anything that disturbs the normal cycle of sleep," Kusiak says - but there is no evidence that "a bite that is off, or constant chewing on one side" causes TMD..." 

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/if-you-hear-a-click-in-your-jaw-this-is-what-you-need-to-know/2017/06/09/594e1e0e-4a26-11e7-a186-60c031eab644_story.html?utm_term=.c5f088636c4c 

TMJ Disorders

Comments:

Login or Register to add Comment