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Patients Front and Center at the 2018 TMJ Patient-Led RoundTable

It is still all too fresh in the minds of many patients. Fifty years ago, between the 1970s and 1980s, some 10,000 TMJ patients received Vitek jaw implant devices.

Funding Opportunities now available for the NIH Common Fund’s Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program

The NIH Common Fund's Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures program aims to understand the biological characteristics underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain and what makes some people susceptible and others resilient to the development of chronic pain.

Opportunity to Voice Your Opinion: U.S. Government Officials Want To Hear from Patients with Pain

FDA Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain On July 9, 2018, FDA hosted a public meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development for Chronic Pain. https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/05/15/2018-10284/patient-focused-

Consider Including the TMJA in Your Financial Planning

We were recently contacted by Tom P. who informed us that he was including The TMJ Association (TMJA), in his financial planning. Tom wrote the following for us to share with our readers:

The Scoop on TMD Pharmaceuticals

Let's say the National Institutes of Health just handed us a multi-million dollar grant to get to the bottom of TMD and find a cure once and for all. I mean, we could start handing out heating pads left and right, but that kind of relief can only get us so far. Whenever I try a different form of therapy or medication, I like to think about the biology, right down to the cellular and molecular level. Why are the cells that make up my jaw region being such jerks?

Hyperreactive Brain Network May Be Cause of Chronic Pain in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

  • Feb 14, 2018

Fibromyalgia is one of the overlapping pain conditions with TMD. This article appeared in Fibromyalgia News Today on January 15, 2018.

A new study suggests a hyperreactive brain network may be the underlying cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia. The study, "Functional Brain Network Mechanisms of Hypersensitivity in Chronic Pain," was published in the journal of Scientific Reports.

The report shows that brain networks of fibromyalgia patients have an underlying hypersensitivity that leads them to overreact to stimulation in an explosive, widespread, and synchronized manner.

This type of response is called explosive synchronization (ES), a phenomenon that occurs both in biological and technological networks, such as during epileptic seizures or power grid failures.

"For the first time, this research shows that the hypersensitivity experienced by chronic pain patients may result from hypersensitive brain networks," Richard Harris, the study's co-senior author and associate professor of anesthesiology at the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center at Michigan Medicine, said in a press release.

The electrical activity of the brains of 10 female fibromyalgia patients were recorded by electroencephalogram (EEG), a noninvasive technique.

EEG results revealed that fibromyalgia patients do indeed display brain network configurations with explosive synchronization properties. In each patient, researchers found a significant correlation between the degree of ES and the intensity of reported chronic pain.

Researchers then used computer models of brain activity to simulate how a fibromyalgia brain reacts to stimulation. They found that the fibromyalgia brain was more sensitive to electrical stimulation than a brain model without ES characteristics.

"As opposed to the normal process of gradually linking up different centers in the brain after a stimulus, chronic pain patients have conditions that predispose them to linking up in an abrupt, explosive manner," said UnCheol Lee, the study's first author, a physicist and assistant professor of anesthesiology at Michigan Medicine.

According to the team, this type of modeling could help guide future treatments for fibromyalgia as brain regions important for explosive synchronization behavior and therapies that target it can first be tested on a computer model.

It is still unknown from a global brain perspective which of the brain network interactions create the subjective sensation of chronic pain. This study suggests, for the first time, that the explosive synchronization phenomena might be the cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia patients.

Overlapping Conditions

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