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Swallowing Changes Related to Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

To investigate whether chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients showed any changes in swallowing compared to a control group. Moreover, it was examined whether swallowing variables and a valid clinic measure of orofacial myofunctional status were associated.

National Academy of Medicine Holds Second TMD Meeting

We have reported previously about the decision of the prestigious National Academy of Medicine (NAM) to convene a committee of experts to examine all aspects of temporomandibular disorders (TMD).

What Does Blood Pressure Have to Do with Chronic Pain?

To understand this possible connection, you have to consider how blood pressure is normally controlled by the nervous system.

Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

Public Workshop Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

National Academy of Medicine Study on Temporomandibular Disorders: From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment

An ad hoc committee, under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Health and Medicine Division, has been convened to study temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a project entitled From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment.

Hyperreactive Brain Network May Be Cause of Chronic Pain in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

  • Feb 14, 2018

Fibromyalgia is one of the overlapping pain conditions with TMD. This article appeared in Fibromyalgia News Today on January 15, 2018.

A new study suggests a hyperreactive brain network may be the underlying cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia. The study, "Functional Brain Network Mechanisms of Hypersensitivity in Chronic Pain," was published in the journal of Scientific Reports.

The report shows that brain networks of fibromyalgia patients have an underlying hypersensitivity that leads them to overreact to stimulation in an explosive, widespread, and synchronized manner.

This type of response is called explosive synchronization (ES), a phenomenon that occurs both in biological and technological networks, such as during epileptic seizures or power grid failures.

"For the first time, this research shows that the hypersensitivity experienced by chronic pain patients may result from hypersensitive brain networks," Richard Harris, the study's co-senior author and associate professor of anesthesiology at the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center at Michigan Medicine, said in a press release.

The electrical activity of the brains of 10 female fibromyalgia patients were recorded by electroencephalogram (EEG), a noninvasive technique.

EEG results revealed that fibromyalgia patients do indeed display brain network configurations with explosive synchronization properties. In each patient, researchers found a significant correlation between the degree of ES and the intensity of reported chronic pain.

Researchers then used computer models of brain activity to simulate how a fibromyalgia brain reacts to stimulation. They found that the fibromyalgia brain was more sensitive to electrical stimulation than a brain model without ES characteristics.

"As opposed to the normal process of gradually linking up different centers in the brain after a stimulus, chronic pain patients have conditions that predispose them to linking up in an abrupt, explosive manner," said UnCheol Lee, the study's first author, a physicist and assistant professor of anesthesiology at Michigan Medicine.

According to the team, this type of modeling could help guide future treatments for fibromyalgia as brain regions important for explosive synchronization behavior and therapies that target it can first be tested on a computer model.

It is still unknown from a global brain perspective which of the brain network interactions create the subjective sensation of chronic pain. This study suggests, for the first time, that the explosive synchronization phenomena might be the cause of chronic pain in fibromyalgia patients.

Overlapping Conditions

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