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And the Committee heard from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

At the end of the NAM meeting, Dr. Gregory Ness, representing the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAMOS) gave the following comments: “AAMOS welcomes the interest and support of the Academies, the NIH, NIDCR, FDA and The

What Allen Told the Committee

Allen Cowley addressed the second open-to-the-public meeting of the National Institute of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) held on March 28, 2019 in Washington, DC. No stranger to the world of TMD, Dr. Cowley is the hus

Some Thoughts on Depression

It is hardly surprising that the chronic pain and limitations in function that many long-time TMJ patients experience can be accompanied by a state of depression, a sense of exhaustion and hopelessness.

Upcoming NAM Public Webinars on TMD

The National Academy of Medicine's (NAM) Committee on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD): From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment is hosting two public web conferences on Wednesday, June 19 and Wednesday, July 31.   Webinar 1: Pati

The NAM Committee Heard from Patients, Too

At the March 28, 2019 public meeting NAM committee members had a chance to hear from TMD patients who had submitted testimony for the record.

And the Committee heard from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

  • Jun 20, 2019

At the end of the NAM meeting, Dr. Gregory Ness, representing the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAMOS) gave the following comments:

“AAMOS welcomes the interest and support of the Academies, the NIH, NIDCR, FDA and The TMJ Association in this collaborative effort to improve the care we deliver… I have little time so I am not going to say nearly as much as I'd like on the issues I've been asked to address or to the patients represented here whose contributions have already been deservedly applauded. Most of us have met before and I have heard your stories before, but they are no less difficult [to hear] than the first time and perhaps more powerful because it may have been three to four years now since that first time but that drives home the fact that in the interim you’ve continued to suffer. To someone like me who has spent almost 30 years working very hard to improve people’s TMJ problems and to train others to do the same, this is a difficult emotional issue to be confronted by. So thank you again and to each of you I say, I’m sorry. I’m sorry that you continue to suffer. That we failed in our promise to make you better, not worse. I’m sorry you heard foolish, ignorant, dismissive, carelessly cruel things from those that were supposed to care for you more than when you really needed it the most. I’m sorry you’ve had far more operations than any one person should ever have, or that you understandably don’t know who to trust. We can point to our many successes, and they are many, but that provides no comfort at all to those of you whom we failed. I think it’s our job now to see how we can shrink your numbers as close to zero as humanly possible so thank you again for pushing us all together. “

View Dr. Ness' presentation here.

TMJ Disorders

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