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DO Show! DO Tell!

There is nothing new about temporomandibular disorders (TMD), conditions of pain and dysfunction affecting the jaw joint and/or its associated muscles and tissues. Headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, and other orofacial pain (OFP) conditions have been around forever. There is nothing new about temporomandibular disorders (TMD), conditions of pain and dysfunction affecting the jaw joint and/or its associated muscles and tissues. Headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, and other o

Meeting Announcement: NIH Pain Consortium Symposium

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN for the 2016 Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium to be held on May 31st and June 1st, 2016, NIH Campus, Natcher Auditorium, Bethesda, MD.  The 2016 symposium, "Innovative Models and Methods," will highlight advanc

Scientific News: Sleep and TMD

Dr. Anne Sanders was kind enough to write the following synopsis of a recent study on sleep and TMD.     A recent study of the OPPERA group reported in The Journal of Pain, sheds new light on the understanding of poor sleep in relation

TMJA Office Update - Spring 2016

After President Obama submits his budget to Congress, the work of Representatives and Senators begins. It is at this time that we tell our elected officials what YOU, TMJ patients, need to have addressed. The past two months have been busy ones outsid

National Pain Study Released

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently released the National Pain Strategy, outlining the federal government's first coordinated plan for reducing the burden of chronic pain that affects millions of Americans. Developed by a diverse team of experts from around the nation, the National Pain Strategy is a road map toward achieving a system of care in which all people receive appropriate, high quality and evidence-based care for pain.

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Nov 20, 2015

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

Recommended Resources