Read the Latest News

New TMD Research Funding Opportunity

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research announced a new funding opportunity for scientists to conduct research on the Pharmacogenomics of Orofacial Pain Management (RO1) http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-16-001.html&n

TMD, Splints, & Sleep Disorders

The National Institutes of Health Brochure on TMJ Disorders states that stabilization splints are the most widely used treatments for TMJ disorders, however studies of their effectiveness in providing pain relief has been inconclusive. Stabilization spli

Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions Report Released

In September 2014, a meeting sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium was held to: Identify resources needed to enhance integration of existing data and optimize collection of data in the future to best advance research on ove

2015 TMD Senate Report Language

2015 Senate Report Language  For over 20 consecutive years, YOUR TMJA's advocacy efforts have resulted in Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Services Appropriations Subcommittee report language

YOUR TMJ Association’s Impact in 2014

We wish you and your family a joyous holiday season and healthy year ahead. Year's end is the time we reflect upon the past and look to the future. We are grateful for your moral and financial support that resulted in several impressive accomplishments in 2014.

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Oct 9, 2014

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

Recommended Resources