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How Accurate Are Dental Websites When It Comes to TMD?

In an eye-opening article to be published shortly in the journal Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology, authors Desai, Alkandari, and Laskin address the critical issue of the accuracy of information published on dental websites about the cause and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMJ/TMD).

Yes, TMD is a Complex Disease

A recent article that appeared in Current Rheumatology Reviews by a Spanish and a Scandinavian author* underscores the complexity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The authors note that these painful conditions have been discussed for over 70 years without reaching consensus on either their causes or treatment.

DO Show! DO Tell!

There is nothing new about temporomandibular disorders (TMD), conditions of pain and dysfunction affecting the jaw joint and/or its associated muscles and tissues. Headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, and other orofacial pain (OFP) conditions have been around forever. There is nothing new about temporomandibular disorders (TMD), conditions of pain and dysfunction affecting the jaw joint and/or its associated muscles and tissues. Headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, and other o

Meeting Announcement: NIH Pain Consortium Symposium

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN for the 2016 Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium to be held on May 31st and June 1st, 2016, NIH Campus, Natcher Auditorium, Bethesda, MD.  The 2016 symposium, "Innovative Models and Methods," will highlight advanc

Scientific News: Sleep and TMD

Dr. Anne Sanders was kind enough to write the following synopsis of a recent study on sleep and TMD.     A recent study of the OPPERA group reported in The Journal of Pain, sheds new light on the understanding of poor sleep in relation

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Nov 20, 2015

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

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