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MAPP Network Basic/Translational Science

The OPPERA study has demonstrated that pelvic pain is moderately associated with Temporomandibualr Disorders. Given this relationship we are publicizing this new NIH research opportunity.   The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic P

Immune System Plasticity in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Complex Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Diseases

Its purpose is to expand contemporary, systematic research approaches to elucidate the role of immune system plasticity in health and in the pathogenesis of dental, oral, and craniofacial (DOC) diseases. The goal is to advance knowledge of the immunologi

Ethics of TMD Treatments

When we read an article by Drs. Kevin Reid and Charles Greene on the ethics of TMD treatment in the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, we thought the message was so important that we asked them to write on this topic for our readers.

Introducing our TMD Nutrition Guide

The pain and jaw dysfunction associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) can impact your ability to chew and swallow food. How and what you are able to eat can seriously compromise your nutritional and health status - an aspect of TMD that is often

New TMD Research Funding Opportunity

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research announced a new funding opportunity for scientists to conduct research on the Pharmacogenomics of Orofacial Pain Management (RO1) http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-16-001.html&n

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Oct 9, 2014

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

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