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Who Owns YOUR TMJ Implant?

Especially during this past year, it’s been brought to our attention by a number of TMJ implant patients having their implants removed that...

Social Security Disability Benefits and Temporomandibular Disorders

Those who suffer from Temporomandibular Disorders also referred to as TMJ or TMD, may find it impossible to maintain the responsibilities...

Pain Sensitivity and Genetic Factors: Act Two of the OPPERA Study

This month we present the last set of findings from “Act Two” of the Oral Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA)...

Symptoms, Sociodemographics, & Psychological Profile: Act Two of the OPPERA Study

Last month we began our report on findings in OPPERA's Act Two," the second series of analyses of data from the Orofacial Pain Prospective...

Temporomandibular Disorders and Sexual Intimacy

A recent posting on the TMJA website included the following request: "I wonder if you could include something in a future newsletter about...

TMD TREATMENTS

Jun 11, 2013

Most people with temporomandibular disorders have relatively mild or periodic symptoms that may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum-chewing) are useful in easing symptoms.

Scientists strongly recommend treating TMJ disorders with the most conservative approaches possible. These are treatments that do not cause permanent changes in, or change the structure or position of, the jaws or teeth. Even when these disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

Recommended Resources

Chronic Pain Research Alliance

Current Research shows these conditions frequently coexist, overlapping with TMJ Disorders

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Endometriosis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Vulvodynia
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Why Is That?

We're wondering too...

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