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YOUR TMJ Association’s Impact in 2014

We wish you and your family a joyous holiday season and healthy year ahead. Year's end is the time we reflect upon the past and look to the future. We are grateful for your moral and financial support that resulted in several impressive accomplishments in 2014.

Only YOU can make TMD one of 20 selected diseases!

We need YOU! Only YOU can make Temporomandibular Disorders one of the 20 diseases to be selected by the Food and Drug Administration for a patient-focused meeting! Deadline: December 5, 2014

TMJA's Seventh Scientific Meeting

On September 7-9, 2014 in Bethesda, Maryland, scientists, clinicians, and patients took part in our Seventh Scientific Meeting, Genetic, Epigenetic, and Mechanistic Studies of Temporomandibular Disorders and Overlapping Pain Conditions.

Support TMJ Advocacy

The TMJ Association is the only patient advocacy organization fighting for the best science that will lead to greater understanding of Temporomandibular and related disorders and safe and effective treatments. We need YOUR help in these efforts. Pleas

FDA Recall Alert: DePuy Synthes Craniomaxillofacial Distraction System

The DePuy Synthes Craniomaxillofacial (CMF) Distraction System is an implant used to lengthen and/or stabilize the lower jawbone (mandibular body) and the side of the lower jaw (ramus). This device is used in pediatric and adult patients to correct birth (congenital) or post-traumatic defects of the jaw by gradually lengthening the bone (distraction).

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Oct 9, 2014

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

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