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FDA Issues Warning Letter to Nexus CMF for TMJ Implant Devices

On June 30, 2015, the Food and Drug Administration’s Center of Devices & Radiological Health sent a warning letter to the President of Nexus CMF telling him that, “Nexus CMF has committed a prohibited act under section 301(q)(1)(c) of the

Some TMJ Patients Like it Hot

In a survey the TMJA conducted of TMD patients and published in the Clinical Journal of Pain, found the most frequently used intervention (65% of respondents) was thermal therapy (hot or cold compresses) to the jaw; these were also found by 74% of the respondents to results in a reduction of symptoms.

Fall Giving Season

The Fall Giving Season Is Upon Us  If you are a government employee who understands the full impact of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) on individuals, their loved ones and society-at-large, please help us to continue to change the face

New TM Joint Bone Formation Discoveries

The following article is from Vital Record News from Texas A&M Health Science Center Findings from researchers at Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry could prove to upend previous dogma on bone formation in the temporomandib

USBJI Career Development & Grant Mentoring Program: Call for Applications

The United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI) and Bone and Joint Canada are dedicated to increasing research of musculoskeletal diseases. The USBJI has developed a grant mentoring program to provide early-career investigators an opportu


  • Nov 20, 2015

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

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