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TMD, Dental Care and You

The daily routine of brushing and flossing your teeth can be difficult when you suffer from Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD). A study published in the Journal of Orofacial Pain states that patients felt their TMD symptoms made it difficult for them to do routine dental care at home.

The Case for Temporomandibular Disorders Heritability

From time to time, The TMJ Association has reported research findings indicating that one or another form of a gene is found more frequently in patients with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) than in non-patients, suggesting a role for genetic factors in

Patient Bone-Related Safety of Botox® for Treatment of TMD

Karen Raphael, PhD, a long-time TMD researcher now at the New York University College of Dentistry, has provided the following commentary on the Susan Herring Botox® article, along with information on her plans for clinical studies of TMD patients who have been treated with Botulinum Toxin for TMD Pain.

Further Evidence that Botox® Injections Cause Bone Loss in the Jaw

An article published online in the journal Bone* by a team of French investigators confirms that injecting Botox® into jaw muscles leads to significant bone loss in adult rats.

MAPP Network Basic/Translational Science

The OPPERA study has demonstrated that pelvic pain is moderately associated with Temporomandibualr Disorders. Given this relationship we are publicizing this new NIH research opportunity.   The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic P

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Oct 9, 2014

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

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