Read the Latest News

Introducing our TMD Nutrition Guide

The pain and jaw dysfunction associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) can impact your ability to chew and swallow food. How and what you are able to eat can seriously compromise your nutritional and health status - an aspect of TMD that is often

CFC 2017 Fall Campaign Begins

If you are a government employee who understands the full impact of Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) on individuals, their loved ones and society-at-large, please help us to continue to change the face of TMJ by designating The TMJ Association as your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) charity #12102.

Patients Needed in Baltimore MD Area: Study on Genetics and Facial, Jaw and Headache Pain

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Nursing asked us to post the following announcement on a research opportunity at the University of Maryland.

Hot & Cold Packs: Most Effective Therapy

In a survey the TMJA conducted of TMD patients, the most frequently used intervention (65% of respondents) was thermal therapy (hot or cold compresses) to the jaw; these were also found by 74% of the respondents to result in a reduction of symptoms.

Emerging Research on Orofacial Pain

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine published a report documenting that at least 100 million U.S. adults-more than the number afflicted by heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined-suffer from common chronic pain conditions that persist for ≥3 mo ("Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research,").

TMD TREATMENTS

  • Nov 20, 2015

Most people with TMD have relatively mild or periodic symptoms which may improve on their own within weeks or months with simple home therapy. Self-care practices, such as eating soft foods, applying ice or moist heat, and avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing) are helpful in easing symptoms. According to the NIH, because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most  conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TM disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

If your problems get worse with time, you should seek professional advice. However, first and foremost, educate yourself. Informed patients are better able to communicate with health care providers, ask questions, and make knowledgeable decisions.

The following are treaments often recommended to patients as well as helpful resources to provide guidance in making your health care decisions.

Recommended Resources